Media tagged African American

Shakira - Hips Don't Lie

About

This is a music video for 2006’s “Hips Don’t Lie,” by Colombian singer Shakira and Haitian rapper Wyclef Jean. It was a salsa and reggaeton-influenced international hit pop song. The theme of the video is a carnival or festival atmosphere, and features Shakira’s signature sensual belly-dancing in various outfits and configurations throughout the video. The song is essentially about a woman telling a man to “read the signs of (her) body” because her “hips don’t lie” in suggesting what she wants from him. Wyclef’s lyrics include stating that the way she moves her body and hips are so suggestive that they make him want to speak Spanish, ostensibly because Shakira is from Columbia and speaks Spanish (in addition to Portuguese and English). Part of the song also includes Wyclef singing simple Spanish phrases, like “como se llama” (what’s your name?), “bonita” (pretty/beautiful), “mi casa” (my house), “su casa” (your house).

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Shit White Girls Say...to Black Girls

About

This clip was uploaded by a Youtube user in early 2012, and is one of many take-offs of the popular “Shit Girls Say” video that went viral in late 2011. It depicts an African-American female dressed as “white”, with a blonde wig, making a series of statements that can be seen as ignorant, racist, and ill-informed. The video is meant to use parody to illuminate the types of everyday insults endured by women of color in a landscape in which racial privilege associated with whiteness is the norm.

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SNL - Screen Guild Awards

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            In this satirical take on award shows, Saturday Night Live (SNL) pokes fun at the racial biases that accompany U.S. entertainment industry award show decisions. In the piece, five White actors are introduced for the year’s “Best Actor” award. As each potential winner is announced, the clips of their work that are shown, usually meant to display their acting fortitude, actually highlight their Black co-stars rather than those nominated. For example, one film features an emotional performance of a Black actor as Thurgood Marshall yet his White costar is nominated for his minor performance as a librarian announcing closing time. During the satirical ceremony, the camera cuts to the reaction of the actors as they are being recognized for their work. The White actors being acknowledged make uncomfortable facial expressions or are entirely oblivious to being honored for their glaringly lackluster performance over their fellow Black cast members, who are seen in the background, with looks of scorn or disapproval on their faces. The video ends with the announcer saying that the award is a five-way tie between all the White actors who celebrate on stage, cheering loudly, “We did it!”
           This video, first shown in 2016, ties with the “Oscars So White” movement—the social media campaign that criticized the lack of racial and ethnic representation and recognition at the Oscars award show. SNL themselves has also come under fire over the years for lacking diversity in their casting. This short is both illuminating and self-reflexive, as the same Black cast members are used multiple times in the clip to express disapproval of dominant onscreen portrayals, while also representing a lack of a range of underrepresented talent amongst their own ranks.

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Sony Playstation - White is Coming Billboard

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This Sony advertisement comes from 2006 ad campaign in the Netherlands. The campaign advertises Sony’s white handheld device (which previously came in black), and personifies the devices through the depiction of race. It features the slogan “White is Coming”, with a pale white woman, with white hair and white clothes physically dominating a black person dressed in black clothes. The ad was pulled due to the protests that saw the depiction as racist and insensitive.

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The Cosby Show

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The Cosby Show was an NBC sitcom that ran from 1984-1992. Centering on the Huxtable family, it was praised for breaking traditional racial stereotypes, portraying African Americans who were educated and successful. In this clip, the Huxtables' daughter Vanessa is distraught because her friends at school think she is a rich girl.

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