Media tagged African American

Dear Young Man of Color - spoken word film

about

“Dear Young Man of Color” is a spoken word piece written and performed by poet Fong Tran that takes the form of a letter to young men of color, addressing systemic, institutional, interpersonal, internalized, and intersectional racial, gender, and class oppression. Speaking from the center of a group of young men of color standing with and framing him, Tran covers topics such as the criminalization of black and brown bodies, the impact of African American, Latino, Asian, and class stereotypes, cultural appropriation, intersectional race, class, and gender oppression, colonization, immigration, the school to prison pipeline, police brutality, and resiliency and activism against oppression. The text of his original poem can be found here.

read more

Dispelling Stereotypes through #blackgirlmagic

About

Produced by ATTN:, a social change news and media company, this one-minute video highlights negative and stereotypical representations of Black or African American women frequently seen in the media. Stereotypes discussed include the “Baby Mama,” the “Angry Black Woman,” Black women as “gold diggers,” uneducated or unrefined, and as “hoes.” In addition to a series of media clips showing examples of these stereotypes from various television shows and movies, prominent Black and African American women are shown speaking about the impact of these stereotypes. For example, First Lady Michelle Obama describes how the media have portrayed her as the “Angry Black Woman” stereotype since Barack Obama announced he was running for president. Between these clips, statistics are also featured on screen, including, “Only 41% of Black women see themselves depicted as beauties,” and “Negative images of Black women appear twice as frequently as positive ones.” This video aims to bring attention to these issues as well as discuss #blackgirlmagic, which became a hashtag trending in January-March of 2016. This hashtag is used to “illustrate the universal awesomeness of black women. It’s about celebrating anything we deem particularly dope, inspiring or mind-blowing about ourselves” and serves as a rallying point in support of women that are speaking back against these established stereotypes. This hashtag has spread, and many people have posted relevant photos and messages using the hashtag on several different social media sites.

read more

Do The Right Thing "Race Off" (EXPLICIT)

about

Do The Right Thing is a highly controversial 1989 film, written and directed by Spike Lee, about a Brooklyn neighborhood gripped by racial tension. In this scene, two of the film's main characters, Pino and Mookie have a candid conversation about race and racism. Mookie points out Pino's hypocrisy: he is racist, but many of his heroes happen to be African-Americcan. As their conversation gets heated, the director takes the audience outside of the scene in the pizza parlor and outside of the story by inserting a series of characters--all different races--yelling racial stereotypes and epithets directly into the camera. The scene ends when the local DJ calls for everyone to take a time out.

read more

Do The Right Thing -- Wall of Shame (EXPLICIT)

about

Do The Right Thing is a highly controversial 1989 film, written and directed by Spike Lee, about a Brooklyn neighborhood gripped by racial tension. In this scene, a young black man and his friends demand that Sal, the Italian-American proprietor of Famous Pizza, add some black celebrities to his restaurant’s wall, which operates in a mostly black neighborhood. Things quickly escalate to the point of violence.

read more

Eddie Murphy - White Like Me

About

In this Saturday Night Live sketch from the 1980’s,Eddie Murphy goes undercover using makeup to see what it is like to be white. The satirical skit follows Murphy as he goes through a number of everyday experiences as a white man. He is shocked to see the many privileges and benefits he receives from other white New Yorkers from a cocktail party in a city bus to free money at the bank.

read more