Media tagged African American

I'm Black But I'm Not...

about

“I’m Black, But I’m Not…” is a BuzzFeed video that addresses stereotypes about Blacks by showing a diverse range of Black young adults talking about Black identity and stereotypes. The first part of the video shows the people finishing the statement, “I’m Black/a, but I’m not...,” and the second part shows them affirmatively stating, “I’m black and I am…” In the end, all of the featured individuals proclaim pride in their blackness. This video was published in 2016 on BuzzFeed, and is part of a series of videos addressing stereotypes and identity, such as in the “I’m Muslim, But I’m Not…” and the “I’m Asian, But I’m Not…” videos. BuzzFeed is an American internet-based news and entertainment company known for producing content that is popular culture/entertainment-oriented and easily sharable and engaged with through social media. While they also produce news articles, most BuzzFeed content is in quick to digest image and graphics-based forms such as lists, quizzes, and short videos.

read more

Intel Advertisement

About

In this advertisement for an Intel processor, a white man in business casual clothing is standing with his arms crossed in the middle of an office. He is flanked on both sides by three identical, uniformed black runners, each kneeling towards the center of the room in starting position. 

read more

I, Too, Am Harvard

about

Launched on March 1, 2014, “I, Too, Am Harvard” (#itooamharvard) is an online photo and hashtag campaign that features portraits of over 50 black and mixed race students at Harvard College holding up dry-erase boards with handwritten examples of racist comments, microaggressions, talk-back messages and quotes, or other difficult interpersonal and institutional interactions they’ve experienced as students. Touching on issues of tokenism, assumption of lack of intelligence, the myth of meritocracy, color blindness, devalued and dismissed perspectives, stereotypical exchanges, and other kinds of problematic interactions, the visually impactful campaign resonated with many people and rapidly spread across the Internet. It further inspired minority students on other campuses to create and share similar projects through their own locally-situated social media campaigns.

read more

Jessie Gets Arrested

About

Jessie Gets Arrestedis a video uploaded June of 2015 by short documentary and film maker Jessie Kahnweiler. The video is part of a series called Jessie Goes There where the film maker tackles issues of race, class, and gender in sort documentary snippets. In the film Jessie attempts to get arrested by various LAPD officers to explore the relationship between white privilege and law enforcement. Her attempts include public drunkenness, trespassing, assaulting an officer, trying to sell drugs, and inappropriately questioning the mayor. The film maker also interviews various Angelinos to explore questions of what white privilege is and how this privilege functions in society.

read more

Jon Stewart - “Signs of Anarchy”

About

In this 2014 clip, satirist Jon Stewart analyzes tensions in Minneapolis after mayor Betsy Hodges posed for a photo with a young black man while both were volunteering for a voter registration drive. The photo, specifically, the two pointing at one another in said photo, sparked controversy, including the local media and police department describing their gestures as a notorious gang-sign. In the video, Stewart plays to the absurdity of this framing by drawing comparisons to babies pointing as their first form of communication, the gestures associated with N.W.A, an influential rap group tied to antipolice sentiment in Los Angeles during the late 80’s and into the 90’s, and what happens at sporting events. Stewart draws the conclusion that the comments from the officers are likely influenced by criticisms the mayor made previously about the police department needing to work on building trust and bettering community relations, including rooting out officers that abuse their positions. Stewart ends the piece by adding pointing to his “list of innocent things black people do that look suspicious,” thereby signifying that this politically motivated exchange between the mayor and law enforcement catches black citizens in its crossfire.

read more