Media tagged Class

Nine West ad – “First Day of Kindergarten” shoes

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This 2014 advertisement for Nine West shoes came from the company’s website, under the category “shoe occasions,” of which there were two: one for the “First Day of Kindergarten” and the other for “Starter Husband Hunting.” The ad reads: “First day of kindergarten: the bus arrives and so do the waterworks. Then it hits you. Mommy now has the weeks off. Wipe those happy-sad tears…we got a shoe for that.” A woman’s lower half is shown in a pink overcoat with high-heeled black shoes. She is holding a tissue, and there are crumpled tissues strewn about her feet as if she has been using them to wipe away tears from crying.

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Norma Rae

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Norma Rae is a 1979 film about a woman in a small town in North Carolina who is fired from her job in a textile factory after she tries to organize a labor union. The film is based on the true story of union organizer named Crystal Lee Sutton. This scene, in which Norma Rae gains the support and solidarity of her co-workers, was a turning point in the movie and in Sutton’s real life. Sally Field, who plays Norma Rae, won the Academy Award for Best Actress for her portrayal.

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Organic Valley: Real Morning Report

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This Real Morning Report video is an advertisement by company Organic Valley for their product Organic Balance, which is a milk-based protein shake in a convenient on-the-go bottle. The commercial splices scenes that show unrealistic representations of women and their morning habits, images often used by other advertisers, and contrasts them with scenes of “real mornings” which are shown to be much messier and more hectic.

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People of Color Recreate Iconic Movie Posters

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This 2015 short film made by Buzzfeed, a pop culture website, showcases people of color recreating the posters of popular movies. Minority groups such as South and East Asians, African Americans, and members of the LBGTQ community are featured in the re-creations, including movie posters for “Mean Girls” (2004), “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” (1961), “Titanic” (1997), “Blue is the Warmest Color” (2013), and “The Breakfast Club” (1985). In between posters, statistics about the underrepresentation of minorities in Hollywood and in the media play across the screen and over the images of the new “actors,” who are dressed in the original costumes that their white counterparts wore for their roles. While some of the statistical facts deal with the idea that minorities are underrepresented numbers-wise, the video also states that the “few roles that cast Asians rarely diverge from existing stereotypes,” which not only calls into question underrepresentation but misrepresentation and the larger issue of the lack of diversity of roles in Hollywood. At the end of the video, we see a collection of the new actors together with the words “Aren’t these movies beautiful in color?,” prompting viewers to think about the “color” (or lack thereof) they see in current films and what they would look like re-envisioned on a more diverse landscape.

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Power 100: Women in Entertainment

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This December 15, 2010 Hollywood Reporter magazine cover features Anne Sweeney of Disney Corporation as Number 1 among “The Definitive List, Power 100: Women in Entertainment.” Sweeney smiles proudly with her arms crossed in a colorful suit jacket. The Hollywood Reporter is published for both general public audiences as well as industry professionals. This issue identifies one hundred women with significant influence in the entertainment industry. The slug line for the feature article describes these women as “The players who run the billion-dollar businesses, their personal stories and why they matter.”

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