Media tagged Class

Kylie Jenner Interview Magazine cover

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This 2015 cover of Interview, a fashion, art, and entertainment magazine, features able-bodied socialite and reality television celebrity Kylie Jenner posing in a wheelchair wearing a black leather bodysuit, choker, and heels.

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Levi's-Everybody's Work

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This ad is part of Levi Strauss’s “Go Forth” campaign, launched in July 2012. With a black and white image, it depicts a man with a shovel across his shoulders, gazing off into the distance. He looks as if he is taking a break from hard physical labor. The image is overlaid with text: "Everybody's work is equally important."

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Levi's - Go Work

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This commercial takes place in the town of Braddock, PA (a suburb of Pittsburgh).  The town, which grew in the mid-20th century around the steel industry, faced tremendous economic hardship after the 2008 US financial collapse.  Braddock received media attention in 2009 when the town’s mayor went on the Colbert Report and questioned the impact of the federal government’s American Recovery and Reinvestment Act on towns like Braddock.  Levi Strauss & Company, the jeans manufacturer, donated more than $1 million to Braddock, and cast residents in commercials for Levi’s.  Print ads and billboards accompanied the TV ad, using phrases such as “We are all workers” and “Ready to work.”

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Levi's - Will Work

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In July 2012, Levi Strauss, a clothing company that specializes in jeans, launched an ad campaign called "Go Forth" that targets their youth audience. This ad depicts a male model, sprawled on a bed of grass, covering his face with his arm. He is decked out in dust-crusted Levi-wear, as if he had just fallen. The ad is overlaid with text: "WILL WORK FOR BETTER TIMES."

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Louisville Flood

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In early January 1937, the Ohio River began to flood. By the end of the month, more than seventy percent of Louisville, Kentucky was under water. Thousands of people were displaced from their homes, businesses were destroyed, and the geography of the city permanently shifted east, outside of the flood plain. In this photograph, taken by Margaret Bourke-White for Time magazine, a line of displaced people--adults and children, all of them Black--wait in line for food and dry clothing in front of an enormous billboard. In a terrible irony, the billboard depicts an idealized American family driving through a bucolic Midwestern scene beneath the words, "World's Highest Standard of Living." Over time, Bourke-White's photo has been used to represent the wealth disparity and precarious socio-economic conditions of the Great Depression.

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