Media tagged Gender Inequality

Shit Girls Say

about

"Shit Girls Say" is a YouTube video series produced by Kyle Humphrey and Graydon Sheppard. The series became a viral hit in 2011 and occasionally featured celebrity cameos. The first episode follows the main character, a male playing a female role, through a series of social interactions. She laments computer difficulties, requests various favors, rummages through her purse, and acts in other manners typically portrayed as female stereotypes.

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Slip of the Tongue - spoken word film

about

At the age of 16, Karen Lum created, directed, and starred in this award-winning film about gender, race, and unrealistic beauty standards. She and William Tsang are featured visually portraying the spoken word poem written and performed by Adriel Luis, whose voice is heard throughout the video. The poem starts with a young man hitting on a young woman with several unsuccessful pickup lines, ultimately eliciting an unexpected response when he blurts out, “girl, what is your ethnic makeup?” Through artful word play with makeup words such as foundation, lipstick, and eye shadow, the poem and video tells the story about how she proceeds to educate him about topics such as the commodification of beauty, unrealistic and unattainable Anglicized beauty standards, how women are measured and valued for their appearance, and the importance of learning the histories of your people within social and historical context. The film was shot in 2005 in Lum’s hometown of Oakland, CA. The full text of the poem can be found here.

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“So Fierce!” Moschino Barbie Fauxmercial

About

This ad is for Mattel's limited edition Moschino Barbie, and opens with a young boy with a mohawk stating, "Moschino Barbie is so fierce!" Moschino is a high-end designer fashion label originating from Italy. This ad resulted in the Moschino Barbies being sold out within a few hours on November 9th 2015. The ad received a lot of positive feedback from people on social media and on media outlets as it was praised for being ground-breaking with a diverse cast, and featuring the first boy to promote Barbie. Although Mattel produced the video, it is not an official advertisement. Jeremy Scott, Moschino designer, was the creative director of the commercial and is passionate about having toys advertised to kids of all genders. This issue hits close to home for Scott as he can relate to his own experiences growing up playing with Barbies, having an interest in fashion, and being bullied and teased for not fitting into socially accepted gender norms of other boys.

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Sonia Sotamayor Nomination

About

This clip is from the Associated Press coverage of the appointment of Justice Sonia Sotomayor to the Supreme Court of the United States in 2009. She was the Court's first Hispanic justice and its third female justice. In one of the opening images, Justice Sotomayor is seen standing alongside President Obama and Vice President Biden at a podium, a moment that the narrator describes as "a picture of diversity." Sotomayor describes herself as "an ordinary person who has been blessed with extraordinary opportunities and experiences." The AP portrays reactions to the appointment as a mix of praise from "Hispanic groups" and criticism from "conservative groups." The role of Sotomayor's life experiences in her professional judgement is also evident in an excerpt of the president's remarks in which he refers to "the wisdom accumulated from an inspiring life's journey." Emphasizing the theme of ideological differences in the Supreme Court, reporter Julie Pace concludes the AP report by stating that "many on the left" hope Sotomayor will be a "counterpoint to the Court's conservatives."

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Soul City

about

This video shows a few excerpts from the television series Soul City, an "entertainment-education" campaign in South Africa that successfully stimulated a community response to the issue of domestic violence.  Entertainment-education projects aim to promote positive (prosocial) messages by embedding them into commercially viable entertainment programming for radio and television. Within the plot of this particular show, whenever neighbors heard a wife being abused by her husband, they started banging their pots at their windows, thus calling attention to the incident and condemning it at the community level. The series was extremely popular in the country, and soon enough people began to emulate this behavior and take action to oppose real cases of domestic violence by loudly banging their pots in the neighborhood. Through the power of narrative, this entertainment-education campaign helped challenge the general attitude of social acceptance regarding domestic violence in South Africa.

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