Media tagged Gender

Cosmopolitan - Parody Cover

About

Originally published on Cracked.com in 2010, this image is a parody cover of a typical women’s magazine such as Cosmopolitan. Using the familiar style and rhetoric of women’s magazine covers, this image makes a visual argument about the undermining effect that such publications have on women’s self-esteem and confidence.

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Cosmopolitan - Rihanna Cover

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Cosmpolitan featured pop star Rihanna on its cover in July of in 2011. Cosmopolitan’s corporate owner, the Hearst Corporation, describes “Cosmo” as, “the lifestylist for millions of fun, fearless females who want to be the best they can be in every area of their lives. Cosmopolitan inspires with information on relationships and romance, the best in fashion and beauty, the latest on women's health and well-being, as well as what is happening in pop culture and entertainment…and just about everything else fun, fearless females want to know.”

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#CoverTheAthlete

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This video is part of the #CoverTheAthlete campaign which aims to highlight and change the biased questioning, commentary, and media coverage of female athletes, which tends to trivialize their accomplishments and focus on their looks. The video features male athletes responding negatively to being asked the same kinds of sexist interview questions that female athletes frequently face, such as questions about appearance, hair styles, weight gain, dating and love life, and being asked to show off their outfit. The video states “Male sports coverage would never sound like this. How come female coverage does?,” and ends with a clip of 20 year-old Canadian tennis player Eugenie Bouchard at the 2015 Australian Open, where a male reporter, Ian Cohen, said, “Can you give us a twirl and tell us about your outfit?” The video ends with the words, “Ask the media to #CoverTheAthlete.”

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Criticizing the way women speak - uptalk, vocal fry, “sorry,” “just”

about

This 2015 video shows writer, producer, and comedian Akilah Hughes responding to popular cultural critiques of how women speak, including vocal fry, uptalk, and saying “sorry” and “just.” The satirical video is presented as a newscast in a segment called, “This Shouldn’t Be News,” and Akilah Hughes takes us through a series of ways that women’s speaking patterns are scrutinized, sometimes publically by prominent, influential, successful women, and how this scrutiny and policing does not apply to men’s speaking patterns. She closes the segment by talking about gender income inequality, the historic and systemic privileging of men in corporate culture, and how women are graduating college at a higher rate.

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Dark Girls trailer

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This trailer from the 2011 documentary filmDark Girls,directed by Bill Duke and D. Channsin Berry, raises issues of racism within the black community. The clip features interviews with several women who recount feelings and experiences connected with prejudices toward their own dark skin color. Notions that lighter skin tones are associated with beauty, intelligence, and respectability while darker skin tones are associated with ugliness, stupidity, and exoticized sexuality are explored and linked to divisions among black people stemming from slavery in the United States.

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