Media tagged Gender

Brett Favre - Wrangler Jeans

About

This commercial ran in the mid-2000s in heavy rotation on television. It depicts the Super Bowl winning quarterback Brett Favre playing football with a group of guys out in an open field.

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Bud Light Institute

about

This commercial, designed to resemble an educational presentation, features “Professor Gerald E. Rodney”. He emerges from an Ivy-covered building of the “Bud Light Institute” and explains how Bud Light has been devising new ways of “keeping women occupied, so men could go out with their friends and maybe have a cold, refreshing Bud Light.” The professor then attributes the creation of tea parties, Tupperware parties, shoe sales, soap operas, and even feminism to the Bud Light Institute – all in the name of distracting women long enough to “free” men to drink beer. The commercial ends with the professor standing before a hundred or so white-coated lab technicians from the “Institute.”

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Burger King-My Way

About

This black and white Burger King print ad features the face of an African American man with braids. His expression could be considered tough or aggressive, as he is stares down the camera. The blurb on the bottom of the ad speaks to the man’s philosophy, in which he talks about his “customized ride” and, working from Burger King's slogan, how he will not have his burger any other way than his own way.

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Cadillac Ad featuring Kate Walsh

About

In this 2007 advertisement for the 2008 Cadillac GTS, actress Kate Walsh is driving the car through a modern city landscape. In a voice-over, she describes the various luxury features of the GTS, but says that the most important feature is, "When you turn your car on, does it return the favor?" and then speeds off into the night. Walsh is most known for her roles on the ABC medical drama Grey's Anatomy and its spin-off, Private Practice, which centers on her character, Dr. Addison Montgomery, a world-class neonatal surgeon.

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Carmen Miranda - Copacabana

About

This is a clip from the 1947 musical comedy film Copacabana. The clip is of a musical number by the film's star Carmen Miranda, a Brazilian singer, dancer and actress who was a celebrity in the 1930s-1950s. In addition to her talent as a performer, she was also known as a sex symbol, marketed as "exotic” and a stereotypical "Brazilian bombshell." Miranda's signature costume was a  revealing dress and colorful "tutti-frutti" turban, a glamorized version of the traditional costume of poor Brazilian women of primarily African descent. Miranda first became a star in Brazil, and then in the United States, even performing at the White House. Her career was encouraged by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's "Good Neighbor Policy," which sought to improve foreign relations between the United States and Latin America though cultural exchange rather than military intervention. However, as she became more popular in the United States, Miranda became less popular in Brazil. Some Brazilians felt that she was succumbing to American commercialism. Others, particularly the upper class, believed that she was representing Brazil negatively because her image appropriated from the most economically and racially marginalized groups within Brazilian society. In addition, Miranda often played characters from many Latin America countries, and some felt that this lead United States audiences to believe that all Latin American cultures were the same. In this clip, Miranda performs a high-energy version of the Brazilian song "Tico-Tico no Fubá" while other characters-- including her character's husband, played by comedian Groucho Marx-- look on and comment about her performance.

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