Media tagged Masculinity

Hip Hop vs. America - Structures of Patriarchy

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This clip comes again from the Black Tree TV/BET special that was produced in 2007. It expands upon the discussion of the exploitation of women in music videos to explore some of the social structural foundations upon which this exploitation is built. It features a lively debate between academics, critics, and rappers like Nelly and TI.

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H&M "Close the Loop" ad

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H&M Close the Loop video is an advertisement for the clothing company’s sustainable fashion through recycling clothes campaign. The ad features a diverse representation of models that are different sizes, ages, genders, sexualities, religions, races, ethnicities, varying degrees of able-bodiedness, and people wearing and presenting their hair - including under arm hair, beards, and head hair - in different styles. The ad features a voice-over saying commonly stated and sometimes contradictory fashion rules and advice while images of diverse, fashionable people in various settings challenge assumptions about these rules. The ad closes with text urging people to leave unwanted garments in any H&M store so that the company can reuse or recycle them into new clothes.

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Honey Maid: Our Dads

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This 2 minute 30 second spot highlights fathers from four different kinds of families as part of Honey Maid’s “This is Wholesome” 2014 campaign. The campaign emphasizes similarities between a range of family configurations, including families with two dads, single fathers, or fathers who have to travel or be away for long periods of time for work, showing how these seemingly “abnormal” families are also “normal” and “wholesome.” For example, the third family shown features a tattooed musician father saying, “people do think that we’re so different. But we actually have a pretty regular life in a lot of ways.” 

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If Women’s Roles in Ads Were Played By Men

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This video uses contrasting shots to show what it would look like if men were asked to play the same kinds of hypersexualized and objectifying roles women are asked to portray in advertisements. For each commercial featured in this video, men are placed in the same positions and roles as the women in the original commercials, and the images are framed side-by-side or back-to-back for comparison. For example, one of the commercials is fast food chain Hardees and Carl’s Jrs.’s charbroiled Atlantic cod fish sandwich ad, which features an attractive female model eating the sandwich in a string bikini on a tropical beach. She poses suggestively as she eats the sandwich, and there are several close-up shots of various parts of her body, including scenes of her spraying herself down with tanning oil in the heat. Each suggestive pose and action is mimicked in a side-by-side comparison with a similarly dressed man posing, eating, and spraying himself down in the same ways, with the same beach background. The video is meant to point out the discomfort, humor, or ridiculousness we see in portraying men in this kind of hypersexualized and objectifying way, and prompts viewers to consider why it is “normal” and acceptable that women are so frequently represented this way in ads and media. With the tagline “more than a piece of meat,” this video was published in 2014 and created by BuzzFeed, a media, news, entertainment, and reporting website that crafts content that can be easily shared and spread through social media.

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I’m Asian, But I’m Not…

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“I’m Asian, But I’m Not…” is a BuzzFeed video that addresses stereotypes about Asians by showing a diverse range of Asian American young adults talking about Asian identity and stereotypes. The first half of the video shows the people finishing the statement, “I’m Asian, but I’m not..” and the second half shows them answering the question, “In addition to being Asian, what are you?” For example, in the first segment, one woman says, “I’m Asian, but I’m not quiet,” and another woman says, “I’m Asian, but most people think I’m Latina.” Another woman says, “I’m Asian, but I’m fifth generation.” A man says, “I’m Asian, but I’m over six feet tall,” and another says, “I’m Asian, but I’m from Kansas.” In the second half of the video, they make statements such as, “I’m Asian, and I’m Hispanic,” “I’m Asian and I’m also an LGBT activist,” “I’m Asian and I love talking about my feelings with my parents,” “I’m Asian and a professional cyclist,” and “I’m Asian, and I’m an extrovert.” The video ends with the message: “Don’t let stereotypes define who you are.”

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