Media tagged Online Media

Kid on Gender at Toys-R-Us

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In this user-uploaded video, four-year-old Riley is shown in the “girls” aisle of a Newburgh, NY, Toys-R-Us. She explains why princesses aren’t just for girls and superheroes aren’t just for boys. Filmed a few days before Christmas in 2011 by Riley’s dad on his cameraphone, the video and the precocious Riley quickly went viral; it was featured by innumerable blogs, picked up by The Huffington Post, and even aired on CNN. With passion and agitation, alternately slapping her forehead and transferring a Fred (from Scooby Doo) doll from hand to hand, Riley proclaims, “The companies who make these try to trick the girls into buying the pink stuff … Some boys like superheroes, some boys like princesses. So then why do all the girls have to buy pink stuff and all the boys have to buy different colored stuff?”

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Love is Welcome Here – Airbnb’s #HostWithPride film

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Created by Airbnb, short-term rental and listing housing company, and Molecule production company, this June 2015 film titled “Love is Welcome Here” shows a diverse range of LGBTQ couples and families talking about their relationships, families, and the kinds of discrimination they face and have to worry about in their everyday lives, and especially when they travel. Examples include a gay male couple who were afraid to ask for one bed when they had been given two in Hawaii, a transgender queer couple who questions how people in conservative American towns would react if they didn’t pass as a heterosexual couple and if people knew the truth about them, a lesbian couple who talk about being afraid for the limitations and prejudices their young son might face for having two moms, and several of the couples describing the careful planning and research they have to do in order to know which cities and countries they can travel safely and openly through. One woman talks about her and her partner’s upcoming marriage and honeymoon plans, saying, “it’s not like we’re trying to be disrespectful or break any laws, we just want to hold hands and celebrate, just like anybody else.” Two of the interviewees also talk about tolerance, with one saying, “My greater hope would be that beyond just being tolerated by a society, but actually being accepted,” and another says, “You shouldn’t be hoping for tolerance, people should appreciate you for the way that you are.” Near the end, one of the women says, “We deserve life and opportunity and happiness.” The film closes with the statement: “We look forward to a world where all love is welcome,” then the hashtag #HostWithPride, and a rainbow colored airbnb logo with the words “belong anywhere” below it.

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Mad Men - Don Loves Roger Remix

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In this video, scenes from seasons 1-4 of the AMC television series Mad Men are re-edited together in way that dramatically changes the plot of the show. In the real Mad Men, which takes place in a fictional advertising agency in the 1960s, characters Don and Roger are both notoriously sexist, constantly being unfaithful to their wives and disrespectful of their female coworkers. In part, audiences are expected to understand their behavior as native to the era in which the show is set, and a major theme of the series is watching Don and Roger react to the changes happening rapidly around them, including the women's rights movement. In addition, for many viewers, Don and Roger's debauched behavior is part of pleasure of the show. In this video, clips from Mad Men are stitched together so Roger's marriage ends not because of his affair with Don's secretary, but because of an affair with Don. This remix was produced by Pop Culture Pirate, an artist and activist named Elisa Kreisinger. Kreisinger is interested both in changing the meaning of texts to challenge people's assumptions and in promoting the Fair Use of copyrighted materials.

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Mary Engelbreit illustration in response to Ferguson

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Illustrator Mary Engelbreit created this poster in response to the fatal shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed African-American teenager, who was shot and killed by White police officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Missouri on August 9, 2014. The event triggered local and national protests, bringing public attention to issues of systemic racial profiling and assumed criminalization by law enforcement, poverty and lack of opportunities for social mobility, and increased militarization of U.S. police forces. The artwork states, “No one should have to teach their children this in the USA,” and shows a Black woman crying as she holds a young child who has hands raised, with “Hands Up! Don’t Shoot” displayed on the newspaper in front of them. All proceeds from the sale of this print were donated to the Michael Brown Jr. Memorial Fund.

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Merriam Webster Online-"Femininity"

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In its definition of “femininity,” Merriam-Webster's online dictionary previously used the word in the following sentence: “She managed to become a CEO without sacrificing herfemininity.” A follower of writer Ali Segel sent her the screenshot of this definition. Segal then tweeted her objection to the definition to her network. From there, the tweet was shared broadly, and reached the attention of Merriam-Webster staff. The staff replied to Segal’s tweet saying “We’re working to remove it now.” Within hours, the example had been removed from the online dictionary.

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