Media tagged Online Media

I’m Asian, But I’m Not…

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“I’m Asian, But I’m Not…” is a BuzzFeed video that addresses stereotypes about Asians by showing a diverse range of Asian American young adults talking about Asian identity and stereotypes. The first half of the video shows the people finishing the statement, “I’m Asian, but I’m not..” and the second half shows them answering the question, “In addition to being Asian, what are you?” For example, in the first segment, one woman says, “I’m Asian, but I’m not quiet,” and another woman says, “I’m Asian, but most people think I’m Latina.” Another woman says, “I’m Asian, but I’m fifth generation.” A man says, “I’m Asian, but I’m over six feet tall,” and another says, “I’m Asian, but I’m from Kansas.” In the second half of the video, they make statements such as, “I’m Asian, and I’m Hispanic,” “I’m Asian and I’m also an LGBT activist,” “I’m Asian and I love talking about my feelings with my parents,” “I’m Asian and a professional cyclist,” and “I’m Asian, and I’m an extrovert.” The video ends with the message: “Don’t let stereotypes define who you are.”

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I'm Black But I'm Not...

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“I’m Black, But I’m Not…” is a BuzzFeed video that addresses stereotypes about Blacks by showing a diverse range of Black young adults talking about Black identity and stereotypes. The first part of the video shows the people finishing the statement, “I’m Black/a, but I’m not...,” and the second part shows them affirmatively stating, “I’m black and I am…” In the end, all of the featured individuals proclaim pride in their blackness. This video was published in 2016 on BuzzFeed, and is part of a series of videos addressing stereotypes and identity, such as in the “I’m Muslim, But I’m Not…” and the “I’m Asian, But I’m Not…” videos. BuzzFeed is an American internet-based news and entertainment company known for producing content that is popular culture/entertainment-oriented and easily sharable and engaged with through social media. While they also produce news articles, most BuzzFeed content is in quick to digest image and graphics-based forms such as lists, quizzes, and short videos.

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I’m Latino, But I’m Not…

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“I’m Latino, But I’m Not…” is a BuzzFeed video that addresses stereotypes about Latinos and Latinas by showing a diverse range of American Latino/a young adults talking about Latino/a identity and stereotypes. The first part of the video shows the people finishing the statement, “I’m Latino/a, but I’m not...,” and the second part shows them answering the question, “In addition to being Latino, what are you?” In the final section of the video, they talk about what it was like growing up in a Latino household. For example, in the first segment, one woman says, “I’m Latina, but I’m not Mexican,” and another says, “I’m Latina, but I’m not spicy.” One man says, “I’m Latino, but I’m not a drug dealer,” and another says, “I’m Latino, but I’m not stealing your jobs.” In the second part of the video, they make statements such as, “I’m Latina and I have a masters degree,” “I’m Latina and I read comic books,” “I’m Latino and I’m a geek,” and “I’m Latino and I’m an American.” In the final section, they talk about growing up Latino/Latina, including the cultures, music, food, and rituals of their families, and Latino/Latina and American identity.

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I’m Muslim, But I’m Not…

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“I’m Muslim, But I’m Not...” is a BuzzFeed video that addresses stereotypes about Muslims by showing a diverse range of young adult Muslims talking about different aspects of their religious, racial, ethnic, national, and gender identities. The video has two parts, where respondents are shown finishing the sentence “I’m Muslim, but I’m not…” in the first part, and “I’m Muslim, and…” in the second. In the first section, the people in the video state their identities and respond to stereotypes. For example, a hijab-wearing woman states that she is Muslim but is not forced to wear the headscarf, and another woman says that she is Muslim even though she does not wear a hijab. A White man says he is Muslim but does not get stopped at the airport because his name is Tom and he is White, and an Asian man says he is Muslim but not Arab. A Black woman says she is Muslim but she is not an immigrant, and does not hate America. Another woman says she is Muslim, but not homophobic, and another says that she is Muslim, but you can be whatever you want to be. In the second half of the video, the respondents are finishing the sentence, “I’m Muslim, and…” and are shown saying things like, “I’m Muslim, and I’m a feminist,” or “I’m Muslim, and I love listening to rap music,” “I’m Muslim, and I’m descended from pilgrims on the Mayflower,” and “I’m Muslim, and my religion teaches me to love everyone.”

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In fashion, cultural appropriation is either very wrong or very right

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This 2015 video from Quartz challenges the idea that cultural appropriation is always negative, with a particular focus on the fashion industry. It features Oskar Metsavaht, a Brazilian fashion designer, who works with the indigenous Ashaninka tribe on a “co-branded collaboration.” The video begins by asking if this is an inspired or exploitative practice, reviewing the various ways cultural appropriation has entered discourse about popular culture. It then argues that Metsavaht offers a positive model for cultural appropriation as an “artist” as opposed to a “cultural tourist.” Metsavaht says the tribe gives him inspiration for his designs, and in exchange he tries to distribute their message regarding environmental concerns as well as royalties.

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