Media tagged Race & Ethnicity

Dave Chapelle-White People Can't Dance

About

In the introduction to this sketch from Season 2 of the Chappelle show, aired in 2004, Dave Chappelle recounts some of the negative feedback that he had received for presenting what he refers to as “racially charged sketches.” He concedes that stereotypical jokes can often lack subtly, and for this sketch, decides to reassess the idea that “white people can’t dance” – a stereotype often perpetuated by whites and blacks alike. Chappelle puts forth his hypothesis: white people can indeed dance as long as they’re listening to the right music. With help from guitarist John Mayer, Chappelle tests his hypothesis in a variety of settings, including a “control group” of Latino and African Americans. The final scene includes an “impromptu” encounter with a pair of police officers - one black and one white - and concludes with the maxim, “people of earth, no matter what your instrument, keep dancing.”

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Dear White People promo: Banned Winchester U Diversity Video

About

LEAKED: Banned Winchester U Diversity Video is a one minute and fifty second video released on Youtube as part of a promotional series for the 2014 comedic film Dear White People. Dear White People analyzes the racial relationships and inequality of a fictional ivy-league school called Winchester University. The supposed “leaked diversity video” was meant to give a quick look at the plot and issues discussed in the larger film.

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Dear Young Man of Color - spoken word film

about

“Dear Young Man of Color” is a spoken word piece written and performed by poet Fong Tran that takes the form of a letter to young men of color, addressing systemic, institutional, interpersonal, internalized, and intersectional racial, gender, and class oppression. Speaking from the center of a group of young men of color standing with and framing him, Tran covers topics such as the criminalization of black and brown bodies, the impact of African American, Latino, Asian, and class stereotypes, cultural appropriation, intersectional race, class, and gender oppression, colonization, immigration, the school to prison pipeline, police brutality, and resiliency and activism against oppression. The text of his original poem can be found here.

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Dispelling Stereotypes through #blackgirlmagic

About

Produced by ATTN:, a social change news and media company, this one-minute video highlights negative and stereotypical representations of Black or African American women frequently seen in the media. Stereotypes discussed include the “Baby Mama,” the “Angry Black Woman,” Black women as “gold diggers,” uneducated or unrefined, and as “hoes.” In addition to a series of media clips showing examples of these stereotypes from various television shows and movies, prominent Black and African American women are shown speaking about the impact of these stereotypes. For example, First Lady Michelle Obama describes how the media have portrayed her as the “Angry Black Woman” stereotype since Barack Obama announced he was running for president. Between these clips, statistics are also featured on screen, including, “Only 41% of Black women see themselves depicted as beauties,” and “Negative images of Black women appear twice as frequently as positive ones.” This video aims to bring attention to these issues as well as discuss #blackgirlmagic, which became a hashtag trending in January-March of 2016. This hashtag is used to “illustrate the universal awesomeness of black women. It’s about celebrating anything we deem particularly dope, inspiring or mind-blowing about ourselves” and serves as a rallying point in support of women that are speaking back against these established stereotypes. This hashtag has spread, and many people have posted relevant photos and messages using the hashtag on several different social media sites.

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Donna Karan - Haiti Ad

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This Donna Karan ad features a light-skinned model in the foreground, sitting in the back of a pickup truck, wearing neutral-toned clothing and a large statement necklace sitting. In the background are two black models, wearing clothing that is not meant to be featured in the ad. The light-skinned model is fully in focus, looking directly into the camera with a challenging stare. Conversely, one of the black models looks beyond the frame, while the other looks at the light-skinned model, and both are in the shadows, out of the picture's focusThe ad boasts, “Photographed in Haiti. Discover the beauty and inspiration”.

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