Media tagged Television

MAD TV - No Blacks on the TV Screen

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This MAD TV sketch is a parody of Chris Rock’sNo Sex in the Champagne Room,a music video in which Rock doles out advice to his viewers in a comedic format. In this MAD TV version, “Chris Rock” (Phil LaMarr) takes the opportunity to give out advice about the role of African Americans in popular television. He tells viewers that “no matter what the networks tell you, there are no blacks on the TV screen – NONE!”

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Male Nurses in Media

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This compilation of clips from popular television shows and movies all point out one thing – that being a nurse is a laughable profession for a male to have. Indeed, male nurses are coded in media as a joke, as necessarily homosexual, and as overall failures.

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Margaret Cho - All American Girl

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This is an episode of the short-lived 1994 sitcom All American Girl, starring comedian Margaret Cho. In it, Cho's character, Margaret Kim, is shown as a modern American 22-year-old who lives with her very traditional Korean immigrant family. The main themes of the series relate to conflicts between Margaret's "wild" lifestyle and her family's expectations of her. In this episode, Margaret takes Amy-- her conservative brother's fiancee, a "proper" young woman who is seen as "perfect" by the Kim family-- to a club for a night of partying before her wedding. After having so much fun at the club, Amy finds it difficult to return to her old life, much to the chagrin of Margaret's brother and the entire family.

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Matt Damon interrupts Effie Brown to explain diversity in filmmaking

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This video clip is from the fourth season (2015) of Project Greenlight, an American documentary television series on HBO that follows first-time filmmakers as they are given the chance to direct a movie. In this video segment, a group of mostly White male producers, including Matt Damon, famous actor and one of the executive producers of the show, are sitting together evaluating the projects. There is one other (White) woman, but the only person of color in the group is Effie Brown, an experienced Hollywood producer who has produced seventeen feature films. As they are discussing one of the films, Effie Brown brings up a concern that the only black person in the movie is a prostitute that is slapped by her white pimp, and that it may be important to be aware of who is selected to direct a scene and characters like that, because of the representational significance of that being the only black person on screen in the film. Matt Damon interrupts to argue that the directing team had already talked about the same issue that Effie was bringing up, and she disagrees. He then proceeds to interrupt and talk over her again, explaining what he views diversity in films to be, saying, “When we’re talking about diversity, you do it in the casting of the film, not the casting of the show,” meaning that diversity concerns only matter when thinking about who is onscreen, and not who is behind the scenes writing, directing, and producing movies. 

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Michelle Obama on Doc McStuffins

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Michelle Obama, First Lady of the United States, plays an animated version of herself in this clip from “Doc McStuffins Goes to Washington,” an October 2015 episode of Doc McStuffins, a Disney Junior animated children’s television series about young African-American Dottie “Doc” McStuffins who wants to be a doctor like her mother and practices by examining, diagnosing, and healing toys, dolls, and stuffed animals. This episode segment shows Doc McStuffins with a group of kids, one of whom is carrying a crate of fruits and vegetables, visiting the White House. Michelle Obama joins the group and praises their efforts to improve themselves and their communities before one of the kid’s toys gets hurt and Doc McStuffins is called on to help.

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