Media tagged Whiteness

I’m Latino, But I’m Not…

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“I’m Latino, But I’m Not…” is a BuzzFeed video that addresses stereotypes about Latinos and Latinas by showing a diverse range of American Latino/a young adults talking about Latino/a identity and stereotypes. The first part of the video shows the people finishing the statement, “I’m Latino/a, but I’m not...,” and the second part shows them answering the question, “In addition to being Latino, what are you?” In the final section of the video, they talk about what it was like growing up in a Latino household. For example, in the first segment, one woman says, “I’m Latina, but I’m not Mexican,” and another says, “I’m Latina, but I’m not spicy.” One man says, “I’m Latino, but I’m not a drug dealer,” and another says, “I’m Latino, but I’m not stealing your jobs.” In the second part of the video, they make statements such as, “I’m Latina and I have a masters degree,” “I’m Latina and I read comic books,” “I’m Latino and I’m a geek,” and “I’m Latino and I’m an American.” In the final section, they talk about growing up Latino/Latina, including the cultures, music, food, and rituals of their families, and Latino/Latina and American identity.

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I’m Muslim, But I’m Not…

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“I’m Muslim, But I’m Not...” is a BuzzFeed video that addresses stereotypes about Muslims by showing a diverse range of young adult Muslims talking about different aspects of their religious, racial, ethnic, national, and gender identities. The video has two parts, where respondents are shown finishing the sentence “I’m Muslim, but I’m not…” in the first part, and “I’m Muslim, and…” in the second. In the first section, the people in the video state their identities and respond to stereotypes. For example, a hijab-wearing woman states that she is Muslim but is not forced to wear the headscarf, and another woman says that she is Muslim even though she does not wear a hijab. A White man says he is Muslim but does not get stopped at the airport because his name is Tom and he is White, and an Asian man says he is Muslim but not Arab. A Black woman says she is Muslim but she is not an immigrant, and does not hate America. Another woman says she is Muslim, but not homophobic, and another says that she is Muslim, but you can be whatever you want to be. In the second half of the video, the respondents are finishing the sentence, “I’m Muslim, and…” and are shown saying things like, “I’m Muslim, and I’m a feminist,” or “I’m Muslim, and I love listening to rap music,” “I’m Muslim, and I’m descended from pilgrims on the Mayflower,” and “I’m Muslim, and my religion teaches me to love everyone.”

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Intel Advertisement

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In this advertisement for an Intel processor, a white man in business casual clothing is standing with his arms crossed in the middle of an office. He is flanked on both sides by three identical, uniformed black runners, each kneeling towards the center of the room in starting position. 

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Is Coldplay’s “Hymn for the Weekend” cultural appropriation?

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This two-minute .Mic video addresses the issue of cultural appropriation vs. cultural appreciation through an analysis of Coldplay and Beyoncé’s 2016 “Hymn for the Weekend” music video. Natasha Noman, a .Mic reporter, describes conflicted reactions to the music video, which was shot in India and features the all White British band interacting with Indian people and traveling through the country witnessing and participating in various cultural ceremonies and rituals. By using clips from different parts of the music video, Noman analyzes what some have critiqued as cultural appropriation, and what others have argued is cultural appreciation. These clips include scenes of religious figures in traditional attire, as well as people celebrating in Indian formalwear, jewelry, and makeup tied to cultural and/or religious practices, and the band, Coldplay, playing their instruments covered in colorful paint thrown by Indian kids participating in the popular Holi festival. Beyoncé is featured in the video as a Bollywood movie star, dressed in a glamorous sari-like dress, dancing in an Indian style, and with Henna on her hands. The .Mic video uses these scenes as well as pop culture examples from Katy Perry, Miley Cyrus, and others to define and compare cultural appropriation versus cultural appreciation.

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Jessie Gets Arrested

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Jessie Gets Arrestedis a video uploaded June of 2015 by short documentary and film maker Jessie Kahnweiler. The video is part of a series called Jessie Goes There where the film maker tackles issues of race, class, and gender in sort documentary snippets. In the film Jessie attempts to get arrested by various LAPD officers to explore the relationship between white privilege and law enforcement. Her attempts include public drunkenness, trespassing, assaulting an officer, trying to sell drugs, and inappropriately questioning the mayor. The film maker also interviews various Angelinos to explore questions of what white privilege is and how this privilege functions in society.

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